• Breathing Through the Storm

    Only a few months ago, our family entered yet another phase of endings and new beginnings. Our twin daughters, having graduated college, found jobs, moved out of the family home, and launched their new lives in earnest. Three weeks ago, both of them, having being asked to work from home, made the trip back to the family homestead to weather the storm. There are suitcases lying around and a dining table covered in laptops and paperwork. One of them begins the day with an early video conference call, at the end of which she’s joined at the table by her sister, who also begins to work. Neal too is working from home, distance teaching, and meeting with his students and staff members over video. I’m doing my best to keep a sense of routine for me while making sure there’s food for all and keeping the house in relative order. Our little dog is confused. So many people, so much traffic. What happened, mom? We had just started to settle. Surprise, surprise… To top it…

  • Working From Home

    I don’t know about working from home, she said. I don’t know if I can be as productive. It’s going to be an adjustment. We spoke the day she found out that her office would be closing for two weeks, because of the coronavirus epidemic, and she would have to work from home. Hearing her apprehension made me realize how challenging it must be to start working from home, not because of choice, but because you have to. Not only that, but you’re asked to work from home because of an epidemic, during a time of chaos, confusion, and uncertainty. When I decided to leave corporate, launch my coaching practice, and work mostly from home, I did it because I wanted to be there for my girls. It was a choice that I made willingly and happily. This is not the case these days, as people are asked to practice Social Distancing, change their daily routine, cancel travel plans, remain vigilant, and self-protect against a contagion. Anxiety, fear, and stress are escalating with each News…

  • Full Speed Ahead? Not So Fast.

    I do love the change of seasons. I even enjoy winter; given a warm coat, a bowl of hot soup, time by the fireplace, and not having to drive on icy roads, that is. There’s a reason the Seasons of Change model is the foundation of my coaching practice. Not only is there infinite beauty in each season but they also provide us with the metaphors that can serve as guidance for navigating life’s ups and downs. Two days ago, I found three ants crawling around my kitchen. “Look,” I called out, “spring is coming!” Neal looked at me and said, “As you wish.” Of course he’d say that but I knew that what he really meant was . . . “Wishful thinking!“ The ants – I’m sorry to say – didn’t survive long. This is my kitchen. Spring maybe coming but it’s not here yet. These ants were way ahead of their time and their little excursion was doomed at the get go. Are you feeling antsy these days? Are you getting impatient and…

  • You Got Rhythm

    My mother loved to dance. She taught me how to listen and feel the rhythm of the music. “You can’t dance if you don’t have rhythm,” she used to say. She taught me the waltz and the tango and some folk dances. The Flamenco from Spain, the Kalinka and the Cossack from Russia, the Tarantella from Italy, and of course a number of Greek regional dances.  Music and dancing were a big part of my childhood and the main form of entertainment duringfamily gatherings, national holidays, seasonal celebrations, and informal gatherings.  Folk music and dancing are deeply rooted in the collective experience of the people in world regions. They tell a story — of how people lived and loved, of hardship and triumph, love and betrayal, desire, disappointment, and heartache — and when the music begins you can feel the emotions in your body. The story takes over when you dance.  When I became a mother, my daughters showed me that there is contentment in personal rhythm. They were two of the happiest babies and…

Scroll Up